Low Plasma Testosterone Is Associated With Elevated Cardiovascular Disease Biomarkers

BACKGROUND:

The relation between testosterone (T) plasma concentration and cardiovascular (CV) risk is unclear, with evidence supporting increased risk in men with low and high T levels. Few studies have assessed CV risk as a function of plasma T levels using objective biomarkers.

AIM:

To determine the relation between T levels and high-sensitivity CV risk biomarkers.

METHODS:

Ten thousand forty-one male patients were identified in the database of a commercial clinical laboratory performing biomarker testing. Patients were grouped by total T concentration and associations with the following biomarkers were determined: cardiac troponin I (cTnI), endothelin-1 (ET-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-17A, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and leptin.

OUTCOMES:

Association of CV risk markers with levels of T in men.

RESULTS:

The median age of the cohort was 58 years (interquartile range = 48-68), and the median plasma T level was 420 ng/dL (interquartile range = 304-565); T levels did not vary with patient age. An inverse relation between plasma T levels and CV risk was observed for 9 of 10 CV markers: cTnI, ET-1, IL-6, TNF-α, NTproBNP, HDL cholesterol, hs-CRP, HbA1c, and leptin. Even after adjusting for age, body mass index, HbA1c, hs-CRP, and HDL cholesterol levels, the CV markers IL-6, ET-1, NTproBNP, and leptin were significantly associated with a T level lower than 250 ng/dL.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:

Men with low T levels could be at increased risk for increased CV disease as seen by increased CV risk markers.

STRENGTH AND LIMITATIONS:

This study was performed in a group of 10,041 men and is the first study to examine CV risk associated with circulating T levels using a large panel of 10 objective biomarkers. This study is limited by an absence of clinical data indicating whether men had pre-existing CV disease or other CV risk factors.

CONCLUSION:

Men with low plasma T levels exhibit increases in CV risk markers, consistent with a potential increased risk of CV disease. Pastuszak AW, Kohn TP, Estis J, Lipshultz LI. Low Plasma Testosterone Is Associated With Elevated Cardiovascular Disease Biomarkers. J Sex Med 2017;XX:XXX-XXX.

Article Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28757119

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